Friday, 21 October 2011 07:52

Restored FW190 takes to the air

    After ten and a half years of restoration, Fw190A-8, werk nummer 173056, took to the air on Sunday 2011, October 9, for the first time in 68 years since wrecked in a French rail yard during the late years of WWII.

    Owned by Don and Linda Hansen's engineering company of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and flown by test pilot Klaus Plasa from Munich, Germany, two flights were made that day, the first a short flight to test flight characteristics and systems, and a second flight to include maneuvers and stalls shown in this video. Additional test flights will be made to expand the flight envelope of the aircraft and to check systems reliability.

    Source

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